Academics
Upper School

Upper School Course Offerings

Curricular development and program integration are vital components of maintaining courses that challenge and prepare students for college and life. Each department at Mount Pisgah is led by a Department Chair who is responsible for maintaining and developing curriculum from kindergarten through 12th grade and assists in implementing best practices. Our courses of study reflect thoughtful design coupled with intentional implementation by faculty. 

List of 5 items.

  • 9th Grade Course of Study

    In addition to required courses, students must enroll in two semesters of academic electives in addition to Personal Health and Fitness.

    English
    Math
    Science
    Social Studies
    World 
    Language
    Christian Education/
    Health
    English I

    OR

    Honors English I
    Geometry

    OR

    Honors Geometry

    OR

    Algebra I
    Biology

    OR

    Honors Biology



    Ancient World History  & Geography

    OR

    Honors Ancient World History & Geography
    Latin 1

    OR

    Latin 2

    OR

    Spanish I

    OR

    Spanish II

    OR

    Honors Spanish II


    Overview of the Bible
    (.5 credit)

    Personal Health and Fitness
    PHE 202
    (.5 credit)
  • 10th Grade Course Offerings

    In addition to required courses, students must enroll in three semesters of academic electives.

    Sophomores are limited to one Advanced Placement (AP) course.

    English
    Math 
    Science
    Social Studies
    World Language
    Christian Education
    World Literature

    OR

    Honors World Literature
    Geometry/Hon Geometry


    OR

    Algebra II


    OR

    Hon Algebra II



    Chemistry
    (co-req: ALG II)

    OR

    Hon. Chemistry
    (co-req: ALG II)

    OR

    Physical Science
    (for students not taking 
    ALG II sophomore year)


    World History: Modern


    OR

    AP World History: Modern




    Spanish III

    OR

    Hon. Spanish III

    OR

    Hon. Spanish IV

    OR

    Latin III

    OR

    AP Latin


    Bible Elective
    (.5 credit)
  • 11th Grade Course Offerings

    In addition to required courses, students must enroll in three to five semesters of academic electives depending on World Language track.

    Juniors are limited to three Advanced Placement (AP) courses.

    English
    Math
    Science
    Social Studies
    World Language
    Christian Education
    American Literature


    OR

    AP Language and Composition
    Algebra II

    OR

    Hon Algebra II

    OR

    Adv. Algebra & Trigonometry

    OR

    Hon. Pre-Calculus


    Chemistry/
    Hon. Chemistry
    (co-req: ALG II)

    OR

    Environmental Science 

    OR

    Human Anatomy

    OR

    AP Biology

    OR

    AP Chemistry
    (co-req: Hon. Pre-cal)
    US History


    OR

    AP US History


    Spanish III


    OR

    Hon. Spanish III


    OR

    Hon. Spanish IV


    OR

    Latin III


    OR

    Latin IV

    OR

    AP Latin


    Bible Elective
    (.5 credit)
  • 12th Grade Course Offerings

    Elective choices are based on progress towards graduation.

    Seniors are limited to three Advanced Placement (AP) courses.

    English
    Math
    Science
    Social Studies
    World Language
    Christian Education
    British Literature


    OR

    AP Literature and Composition
    Adv. Alg. & Trig.

    OR
    Honors Pre-Calculus

    OR
    Statistics

    OR

    Calculus

    OR

    AP Statistics

    OR
    AP Calculus
    Chemistry/ Hon. Chemistry (co-req: Alg 2)

    OR
    Environmental Science

    OR
    Human Anatomy

    OR
    AP Biology             

    OR
    AP Chemistry (co-req: Hon. Pre-cal)
    OR

    Physics (prereq: Adv. Alg. & Trig)

    AP Physics 1 (co- or prereq: Hon. Pre-cal)
    Economics

    OR

    Honors Economics

    OR

    Government

    OR

    Honors Government



    AP Spanish          

    OR

    Hon. Spanish IV


    OR

    Latin IV


    OR

    AP Latin
    Bible Elective
    (.5 credit)


    Bible Elective
    (.5 credit)
  • Advanced Placement Courses Offered

    • Art History
    • Biology
    • Calculus AB
    • Chemistry
    • Computer Science A
    • Computer Science Principles
    • English Language and Composition
    • English Literature and Composition
    • European History
    • Latin
    • Music Theory
    • Psychology
    • Physics I: Algebra Based
    • Spanish Language and Culture
    • Statistics
    • Studio Art
    • US History
    • World History
    • Microeconomics
    • US Government and Politics
    Students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP Examination in May.  The fee for the exam is set by The College Board and is announced annually.

English

4 Credits Required

List of 8 items.

  • 9th Grade English

    English 101 serves as a general introduction to Upper School English designed to develop basic skills of students as mature readers and writers. Students engage with works from a variety of genres including novels, essays, plays and poetry. Grammar and vocabulary acquisition will be integrated with close reading textual analysis. By examining the purposes of writing, students will develop their own written expression and improve their language awareness while discovering the depth and richness of literary studies.
  • 9th Grade Honors English

    You will learn techniques of literary criticism and be introduced to major components of literary theory. As a class, we will engage with works from a variety of genres including novels, essays, plays and poetry. Grammar and vocabulary acquisition will be integrated with close reading textual analysis. In the first semester, you will enhance your understanding of principles of critical thinking and apply your knowledge in writing, analysis, and oral presentations. In the second semester, you will apply higher order thinking, in-depth research, and advanced writing techniques to refine the written assessments you produce. 
  • 10th Grade World Literature

    The class is divided into four main focus areas: literature, grammar, composition/creative writing and vocabulary. This course continues to build on the grammar curriculum that is taught in 9th Grade English. Students should be able to demonstrate mastery of important grammatical concepts by elevating knowledge and usage of this skill set. Classical novels, from a range of nationalities, periods, cultures and genres, are read. Each week, students complete short, creative writings using the vocabulary words for the week. 
  • 10th Grade Honors World Literature

    This course builds on the grammar curriculum students were taught in 9th Grade English. Honors students should be able to demonstrate mastery of important grammatical and literary concepts at levels involving greater depth and originality. They read classical novels from an expanse of nationalities, periods, cultures and genres. Honor students are required to submit a research project. In order to complete this project, students are provided with a supplemental reading list. 
  • 11th Grade American Literature

    Through the study of American literature students not only become aware of the great, controversial, and beautiful ideas contained in America’s literary history but also examine the interactions among the writer’s purpose, subjects, and audience expectations. Assignments consist of expository, personal, and persuasive writing, oral expression, vocabulary development, and research and analysis. 
  • AP Language and Composition

    "An AP English Language and Composition Course cultivates the reading and writing skills that students need for college success and for intellectually responsible civic engagement. The course guides students in becoming curious, critical, and responsive readers of diverse texts and becoming flexible, reflective writers of texts addressed to diverse audiences for diverse purposes. The reading and writing students do in the course should deepen and expand their understanding of how written language functions rhetorically: to communicate writers' intentions and elicit readers' responses in particular situations" (CollegeBoard). Class discussion is in-depth and analytical. Formal and informal writing assignments are numerous. Additionally, because this class is recognized by the College Board, and the syllabus reflects collegiate standards, students enrolled in this class are held to a higher standard of maturity in regards to both their commitment and behavior. 
  • 12th Grade British Literature

    Students develop an understanding of chronological context, exploring the ways in which a work is (or isn’t) shaped by the world around it. Instruction in language conventions generally occurs within the context of reading, writing and speaking, rather than in isolation. The class involves oral presentations, seminar-style discussions, research papers, timed writing, and other formal and informal assessments. 
  • 12th Grade English Literature and Composition

    “The AP English Literature and Composition course focuses on reading, analyzing, and writing about imaginative literature (fiction, poetry, drama) from various periods. Students engage in close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, and symbolism. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works” (CollegeBoard). In addition, since this is a college-level class, a greater maturity is expected of the students in terms of commitment to the class. 
ESL Courses

List of 2 items.

  • Sheltered English Language Arts 9/10

    This course is open to qualified freshmen and sophomore international students and others for whom English is an additional language. This is an Upper School English Language Arts course with assignments carefully scaffolded and tailored to challenge students at their current English proficiency levels. Our focus is on reading and doing written and spoken analysis of literary and informational texts. The course is structured around the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English Language Arts 9-10. This course replaces English 9 or English 10 and is a year-long course with a full homework load. Students receive letter/numerical grades. iTEP-SLATE Plus, TOEFL Junior, IELTS, or TOEFL iBT scores are required prior to enrollment in this course. 
  • Sheltered English Language Arts 11/12

    This course is open to qualified juniors and senior international students and others for whom English is an additional language. This is an Upper School English Language Arts course with assignments carefully scaffolded and tailored to challenge students at their current English proficiency levels. Our focus is on reading and doing written and spoken analysis of literary and informational texts. The course is structured around the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English Language Arts 11-12. This course replaces English 11 or English 12 and is a year-long course with a full homework load. Students receive letter/numerical grades. iTEP-SLATE Plus, TOEFL Junior, IELTS, or TOEFL iBT scores are required prior to enrollment in this course.

Mathematics

4 Credits Required

List of 11 items.

  • Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry

    Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry topics are presented in multiple ways, such as concrete/pictorial, verbal/written, numerical/data-based, graphical and symbolic. Concepts are introduced and used, where appropriate, in the context of realistic situations and accompanied by appropriate use of technology. Topics studied include: linear relationships and functions, systems of linear equations and inequalities, polynomial and rational functions and their graphs, trigonometric functions and their graphs and trigonometric identities and equations.
  • Algebra I

    This course begins with a review of basic concrete skills, using the four fundamental math operations, variables, simple equations and the number system. Later concepts include topics such as real numbers, fractions, linear functions, polynomials, systems of linear equations, equalities and inequalities, rational and irrational numbers and expressions and quadratic functions. Problem-solving techniques, with emphasis on accurate calculation skills, are incorporated throughout the year as related concepts are taught. Students master basic algebraic skills and their practical applications in preparation for subsequent required course work such as Geometry and Algebra II.
  • Algebra II

    Principle course skills in Algebra II include simplifying algebraic expressions, solving linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, factoring polynomials, applications of factoring, operations with rational expressions, complex and irrational numbers, graphing equations and inequalities, the study of functions, exponents and logarithms. Included in the course work and derived from previous skills are many applications using basic and advanced word-problem strategies. The use of a scientific/graphing calculator is required. 
  • AP Calculus

    This course is designed for those students who have shown significant mastery of algebraic and trigonometric skills. Students are exposed to studies in many rigorous topics, including limits, continuity, differentiation and definition of integral, fundamental theorem of calculus, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, techniques of integration and various applications. The use of a scientific/graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: Honors Pre-calculus. 
  • AP Statistics

    Advanced Placement Statistics is the upper school equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college statistics course. In this course, students develop strategies for collecting, organizing, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students design, administer and tabulate results from surveys and experiments. Probability and simulations aid students in constructing models for chance behavior. Sampling distributions provide the logical structure for confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. Students use a TI -83/84 or TI-Nspire graphing calculator, various statistical software and Web-based java applets to investigate statistical concepts. To develop effective statistical communication skills, students are required to prepare frequent written and oral analyses of real data. 
  • Calculus

    This advanced math course is ideally suited for students interested in business and economics, life sciences, and social sciences, but are not ready for AP calculus. This course begins with an extensive development of a library of elementary functions, including their properties and uses.  Both differential and integral calculus are studied with an emphasis on application. Students are also introduced to multivariable calculus, as well as brief discussion of differentiation and integration of trigonometric functions. Students are encouraged to investigate mathematical ideas and processes graphically, numerically, algebraically, and verbally.  Graphing calculator technology will be extensively used in this course and students will continue their study of mathematical modeling. 
  • Geometry

    Geometry reinforces algebraic skills as well as incorporating the study of measurement, properties and relationships of points, lines, angles, surfaces and solids. Students continue growth in problem solving and reasoning learned in Algebra I through the study of the relationships of different shapes. The course includes techniques of inductive and deductive reasoning, as written in two-column, paragraph, flow and indirect proofs. Right triangle trigonometry is learned and applied to real world situations. 
  • Honors Algebra II

    Principle course skills in Honors Algebra II include simplifying algebraic expressions, solving linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, factoring polynomials, applications of factoring, operations with rational expressions, complex and irrational numbers, solving polynomial equations, graphing conic sections, the study of functions, exponents and logarithms. Included in the course work and derived from previous skills are many applications using basic and advanced word-problem strategies. The use of a scientific/graphing calculator is required. Students in Honors will be expected to extend their understanding of Algebra II through critical thinking, independent work, and more challenging problems.  
  • Honors Geometry

    Honors Geometry reinforces algebraic skills as well as introduces new subject areas. Students continue growth in problem solving and reasoning learned in Algebra I through the study of the relationships of different shapes. The course includes techniques of inductive and deductive reasoning, as written in two-column, paragraph, flow and indirect proofs. Right triangle trigonometry is learned and applied to real world situations. Students in Honors will be expected to extend their understanding of Geometry through critical thinking, independent work, and more challenging problems.  
  • Honors Pre-Calculus

    Honors Pre-Calculus prepares students for the rigors of Calculus. Topics are presented in multiple ways, such as concrete/pictorial, verbal/written, numerical/data-based, graphical and symbolic. Concepts are introduced and used, where appropriate, in the context of realistic situations and accompanied by appropriate use of technology. Topics studied include: linear functions, polynomial functions, power functions, rational functions, exponential functions, logistic functions, logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, matrices, conic sections, limits and derivatives. Students will be held to a higher standard across all aspects of the course as compared to on-level Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry. 
  • Statistics

    Statistics is the science of collecting, organizing, analyzing and interpreting data in order to make decisions. This course examines descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, and statistical inference. This course gives students a deep understanding of these topics, allowing them to use statistics to make informed decisions. 

Science

4 Credits Required

List of 11 items.

  • AP Biology

    This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory level biology course. The curriculum is based on four big ideas:
    1. The process of evolution (def. change of time) drives the diversity of life. 
    2. Biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce and to maintain dynamic homeostasis. 
    3. Living systems store, retrieve, transmit and respond to information essential to life processes.
    4. Biological systems interact and these systems and their interactions possess complex properties.
    Extensive laboratory work will be an important part of the course with reports done in great detail. Lab work includes ten AP labs, along with multiple abbreviated lab-learning opportunities, focusing on lab technique and core curriculum topics. Extensive, inquiry-based, laboratory experiences are designed to develop scientific reasoning, data collection, technological skills and partner communication. The curriculum follows the AP Curriculum Framework for Biology. Students are required to take the AP Examination for Biology. An AP Lab Course is required in addition to the class period.
  • AP Chemistry

    This course is comparable to general chemistry taken during the first college year. Students learn to apply the basic principles, concepts and operations of college chemistry. Topics include atomic theory, bonding, periodicity, acid-base chemistry, oxidation-reduction, equilibrium and thermodynamics. Students maintain a laboratory notebook and use scientific calculators to solve problems. This course requires extensive, nightly home preparation. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement examination in May. Prerequisite: Honors Chemistry. A lab period is required in addition to the class period. 
  • AP Physics

    This course is an algebra-based, introductory college-level course that explores topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory simple circuits. Through inquiry based learning, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills. Prerequisite: Honors Pre-Calculus. Seniors only.
  • Biology

    This course gives students an understanding of some of the major concepts of cellular biology and ecological concepts. Topics such as cell structure and function, heredity, evolution, interdependence of organisms, biochemistry, energy and organization in living systems are taught using a variety of learning strategies. The course also addresses how science is related to career decisions, personal welfare and responsibilities as citizens, the quality of life and the economic status of our country. Students gain knowledge and engage in the processes that enable them to solve problems and make sound decisions, establishing patterns of lifelong curiosity and learning. 
  • Chemistry

    Chemistry uses experimentation, observation and problem solving to reinforce a study of atomic theory, bonding, periodicity, reactions, measurement and primary states of matter. The student utilizes mathematical skills to analyze and synthesize quantitative data. Additional emphasis is placed on problem solving, disciplined studying and writing lab reports. The latter employs the process of critical thinking and analytical reasoning required by the scientific method. The course also emphasizes laboratory skills, safety in handling chemicals and equipment, and the ability to work in collaborative groups. 
  • Environmental Science

    This course explores some of the major concepts of environmental science. Topics - such as human population growth and cultural revolutions, the advent of environments concerns, fossil fuels, nuclear and alternative energies, air pollution and conservation, soil erosion and conservation, waste disposal and management, the cycling of Earth’s resources, interactions in bio systems – are introduced through a variety of learning strategies. The course also addresses how science is related to career decisions, personal welfare and responsibilities as citizens, quality of life and the economic status of our country. Students have the opportunity to gain knowledge about and engage in the processes that enable them to solve problems and make sound decisions, establishing patterns of lifelong curiosity and learning. 
  • Honors Biology

    This course gives students an understanding of some of the major concepts of cellular biology and ecological concepts. Topics such as cell structure and function, heredity, evolution, interdependence of organisms, biochemistry, energy and organization in living systems are taught using a variety of learning strategies. Honors students will be required to complete extension activities and additional projects. The course will also address how science is related to career decisions, personal welfare and responsibilities as citizens, the quality of life and the economic status of our country. Students will have the opportunity to gain knowledge and engage in the processes that will enable them to solve problems and make sound decisions, as well as establish patterns of lifelong curiosity and learning to help students be prepared for college and ready for life. 
  • Honors Chemistry

    Honors Chemistry is an advanced comprehensive upper school chemistry course. The Honors Chemistry class will focus more on the depth of foundational concepts and explore more advanced topics. The topics to be studied this year are the atomic structure, the design of atoms, the periodic table, bonding, nomenclature, reactions, solutions, acids, bases and two specialized branches of chemistry (organic and biochemistry). The experiments in the laboratory exercises will incorporate problem solving, planning and designing, performance, analysis and application. The course strives to emphasize critical thinking and analysis skills, laboratory skills, safety in handling chemicals and equipment, connectivity to algebra and the ability to work in collaborative groups.
  • Human Anatomy

    This course provides a basic understanding of the structure and functions of the human body with an emphasis on homeostasis. Study includes anatomical orientation, protection, support and movement, integration and regulation, transportation, absorption and excretion, reproduction, growth and development. This course also emphasizes laboratory skills and the ability to work in collaborative groups. 
  • Physical Science

    This course is an overview of the major concepts in physics and chemistry. Concepts such as structure of atoms, motion and forces, conservation of matter and energy, action-reaction principle and the behavior of waves are taught using a variety of learning strategies. The course also addresses how science is related to career decisions, personal welfare, responsibilities as citizens, the quality of life and the economic status of our country. Students gain knowledge and engage in processes that enable them to solve problems and make sound decisions, establishing patterns of lifelong curiosity and learning. 
  • Physics

    Physics provides students with a conceptual understanding of physical concepts as it helps develop problem-solving skills using mathematics. Students gain a better understanding of how the world around us operates and are prepared for further college study of physics. Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry or Honors Pre-Calculus. Seniors only.

Social Studies

4 Credits Required

List of 10 items.

  • 10th Grade World History: Modern

    This course builds upon Ancient World History and Geography, analyzing global political, economic, and social trends and connections since 1200 CE. Students will continue to engage in learning activities that stimulate thought and curiosity as they explore human global connections that drive the past, present and future. Students will critically analyze primary and secondary sources and write document-based, argumentative essays based upon thorough research and analysis. The course loosely adheres to the AP curriculum, engaging the six major AP World History themes: humans and the environment, cultural developments and interactions, governance, economic systems, social interactions and organization, and technology and innovation. 
  • 11th Grade United States History

    This course instills in students an appreciation and critical understanding of the American experience. To achieve this goal, students read, write, articulate and think critically about the scope of American history. Students learn the pivotal events, key personalities, great movements and important developments in American history from Pre-Columbian civilizations to the present. Classroom activities include, but are not limited to: discussion, lecture, cooperative learning groups, role-play, essays, creative writing, study guides, vocabulary, oral presentations and debate. 
  • 9th Grade Ancient World History and Geography

    This interdisciplinary course focuses upon building and enhancing students’ analytical skills. The scope of the course focuses upon civilizations, as well as political and physical geography, prior to 1200 CE. Current events are interspersed with historical analysis to help students connect their study of the ancient world with modern social, economic and political contexts and trends. Students will engage in learning activities that stimulate thought and curiosity as they explore human global connections that drive the past, present and future. Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze primary and secondary sources, compare and contrast historical and modern globalization trends and explain their views through essay writing and oral presentation.
  • 9th Grade Honors Ancient World History and Geography

    The Honors level Ancient World History and Geography course replaces the regular course, with more rigorous instruction and a higher expectation in regard to student academic performance. This interdisciplinary course focuses upon building and enhancing students’ analytical and evaluative skills. The scope of the course focuses upon civilizations, as well as political and physical geography, prior to 1200 CE. Current events are interspersed with historical analysis to help students connect their study of the ancient world with modern social, economic and political contexts. Students will formulate well informed hypotheses, develop argumentative essays and present their work. Student work will focus upon evaluating continuity and change over time, contextualization, comparison, and causation. 
  • AP Microeconomics

    AP Microeconomics is a college-level course that introduces students to the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual economic decision-makers. The course also develops students’ familiarity with the operation of product and factor markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts.
  • AP U.S. Government and Politics

    AP U.S. Government and Politics provides a college-level, nonpartisan introduction to key political concepts, ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the constitutional system and political culture of the United States. Students will study U.S. foundational documents, Supreme Court decisions, and other texts and visuals to gain an understanding of the relationships and interactions among political institutions, processes, and behaviors. They will also engage in disciplinary practices that require them to read and interpret data, make comparisons and applications, and develop evidence-based arguments. In addition, they will complete a political science research or applied civics project.
  • AP US History

    This course replaces United States History with a College Board-approved course in which students are expected to write, analyze and assess at a higher level. “In AP U.S. History, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods from approximately 1491 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change. The course also provides eight themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: American and national identity; work, exchange, and technology; geography and the environment; migration and settlement; politics and power; America in the world; American and regional culture; and social structures” (2019-2020 Course and Exam Description, p. 7). Students are required to take the College Board AP U.S. History examination in May. Students work toward preparation for the May AP Exam by practicing test-taking strategies, extensive readings, extensive writing and copious note taking. 
  • AP World History: Modern

    This course replaces World History: Modern with a College Board-approved course in which students are expected to write, analyze and assess at a higher level. “In AP World History: Modern, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes from 1200 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: humans and the environment, cultural developments and interactions, governance, economic systems, social interactions and organization, and technology and innovation” (2019-2020 Course and Exam Description, p. 7).

    Because all students take a year-end exam in May, there are very specific content and skill benchmarks that the course must achieve throughout the year. All students should begin this course with a clear understanding that the class is rigorous and maintains a very fast pace. Success in this course requires organization, motivation and flexibility. The most successful students in this course end the year with a good understanding of university-style pacing and learning.
  • Economics

    This is a required, one-semester course offered at the senior level. Economics is the study of choice and how individuals, governments and institutions impact the marketplace and overall economy. Students understand and analyze organizing principles including micro-economics, macro-economics and personal finance and investing. By the end of the semester students are able to see all choices through the lens of economic theory. Classroom activities include, but are not limited to: discussion, Socratic lecture, cooperative learning groups, role-play, essays, and debate. 
  • Government

    This is a one-semester, required course offered at the senior level. The government course instills an appreciation and an understanding of the history, structure and functions of government at the local, state and national level. Students examine the philosophical foundations, the structure and functions of the American government and its relationship to the states and citizens. Students also compare the American system with other systems of government. Students are challenged to develop their own interpretation of American political life and are prepared for the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. 

Christian Education

2 credits required, .5 each year

Christian Education

List of 6 items.

  • Apologetics: The Search for Meaning

    The search for meaning and purpose is central to the human experience.  Why are we here, where did we come from, what is good or bad, and where are we headed?  The human attempt to answer these questions has led to several resulting philosophies and religious experiences worthy of examination.  This course will seek to identify how humans aim to create meaning outside of God, will study specific belief systems that have developed in modernity (such as New Ageism, Scientology), will analyze the ethics of pop culture, and will consider the validity of a biblical perspective when it comes to answering some of life's most powerful questions.         
  • Introduction to Christianity

    This course is open to Upper School international students new to MPCS. Geared toward students who have never heard the name Jesus, this class gives students a background to understand the Christian faith and culture. This course covers the structure and organization of the Holy Bible. We read passages from the Bible to understand who God, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit are, what the Trinity is, and why we celebrate Christmas and Easter. We learn about sin and the need for redemption through the blood of Jesus Christ. The course also provides a place to further explore what is discussed during Fresh Air (Chapel) sessions. As needed, this course also provides language support for students’ other classes. 
  • Life of Christ

    This semester course will work through a comparison and contrast of the four gospels as we unpack the life of Jesus and his miracles. We will also cover parts of Acts as we see the fulfillment of Jesus’ purpose on Earth.
  • Overview of the Bible

    Overview of the Bible is an introductory course for all incoming freshmen, which will present important themes throughout the entirety of Scripture, threading the Old and New Testaments into one holistic story. While this course will cover the main characters, events, and information presented throughout Scripture, students will aim to see the Bible not simply as a disjointed collection of ancient history, but as a beautiful story communicating to us God's relationship to both the ancient world and today. Focus will be placed on where the Bible came from, the history of Israel, the beginnings of the Church, and how to apply Biblical principles and teachings in our modern world. 
  • Practical Theology

    Students will be introduced to the life and theology of the apostle Paul as they study the book of Romans. The class includes a brief biographical look into Paul’s life through the eyes of his close friend Luke in the book of Acts. As the focus of the class moves to the book of Romans, students will gain an insight into the theology of Paul. Students will study the first eight chapters of the book in order to understand the essence of the gospel through Paul’s writing. 
  • World Religions

    This course surveys the foundational beliefs and practices of the world’s leading religions. Students explore and analyze what other cultures believe and why. Additionally, students view such beliefs and practices through the prism of Christianity. 

World Languages

3 credits required; may include MS credits

List of 12 items.

  • AP Latin

    The AP Latin course is designed to give students the training and experiences needed to be successful on the College Board AP Latin exam. Our course goals are to develop the students’ abilities to translate the required passages from Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar’s De bello Gallico into English as literally as possible, to help them understand the context of the written passages (including the political, historical, literary, and cultural background of each author and text), and to help them understand the reasons behind particular styles of writing and the rhetorical devices employed. With these considerations in mind students will learn to analyze the text and draw their own logical conclusions. Students will have the opportunity to review a variety of annotated texts of the Aeneid and the De bello Gallico which provide copious AP practice questions. This course encourages students to read Latin prose and poetry aloud and at sight with accurate comprehension and appreciation. For the Vergil text, students will learn dactylic hexameter and how it is used to enhance the text and create effect, and students will scan the poetry regularly. Assessments will include homework, exams, sight translations, presentations, vocabulary quizzes, research projects, recitations, and analytical and interpretative essays. 
  • AP Spanish

    This AP Spanish Language and Culture course has been designed specifically around the AP Spanish Language exam and is meant to maximize the student’s preparedness for the exam. This course will focus on improving the student’s proficiency across the three modes of communication presented on the exam: interpretive, interpersonal and presentational by using a variety of authentic Spanish-language resources from various authentic Spanish-language media including online print, audio and audiovisual, as well as from more traditional sources that include literature, essays, magazine and newspaper articles and charts, tables and graphs. 
  • Latin I

    The first year of Latin begins the process of comprehending the Latin language through practice and reading it. Through these readings, students develop an understanding of the social and political history of the Romans, especially during the first century A.D. 
  • Latin II

    During this second year of Latin, students refine Latin reading skills and continue to strengthen English reading and vocabulary skills through vocabulary building and structure analysis. Through the reading selections and class discussions, students acquire more in-depth knowledge of the daily lives and history of the Romans and continue to make comparisons relevant to today’s society. Furthermore, the students also compare the effects of the geography of the ancient Roman world and that of the United States on aspects of culture, such as food, dwellings, clothing and the arts. Intermediate and advanced writing tasks also build a bridge to understanding the written word.
  • Latin III

    All skills developed in Latin I and Latin II are applied in this course. Major emphasis is placed upon continuing and advancing communication in the four skill areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students enhance their writing skills; review and master previously acquired grammatical skills, and increase the quantity and application of vocabulary. A main focus of this course will be the construction and usage of the subjective mood. Readings will include cultural topics designed to reinforce important unit themes, as well as excerpts from Latin literature.  
  • Latin IV

    Our Latin 4 class seeks to accomplish two goals. For the students who will be going on to AP Latin the following year, this class provides another year of scaffolding, wherein students are presented with a comprehensive grammar review while they read Latin from original sources. Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar’s De Bello Gallico will be highlighted. For non AP students, Latin 4 is a great survey of Roman literature. Works will include Ovid, Catullus, and Plautus, in addition to Vergil and Caesar. Throughout the year, students will encounter Roman art and architecture that augment their understanding of the written word. 
  • Spanish I

    This course is a comprehensive introduction to the Spanish language. Students will develop basic language skills in listening, reading, speaking and writing. Basic grammatical structures will be presented including sentence constructions, present tense of regular and irregular verbs, direct and indirect object complements as well as additional verb tenses and deeper investigation into basic verb usage. The curriculum is based upon the five Standards in World Language Education which are communication, cultures, connections, comparisons and communities.
  • Spanish II

    This course is an intermediate level Spanish language course. Students will expand their language skills in listening, reading, speaking and writing. Basic grammatical structures will be reviewed as complex grammatical structures will be introduced including past tense conjugations of regular and irregular verbs, the imperative tense and the use of reflexive and reciprocal constructs. The curriculum is based upon the five Standards in World Language Education which are communication, cultures, connections, comparisons and communities. 
  • Spanish II Honors

    This course is an intermediate level Spanish language course. Students will expand their language skills in listening, reading, speaking and writing. Basic grammatical structures will be reviewed as complex grammatical structures will be introduced including past tense conjugations of regular and irregular verbs, the imperative tense and the use of reflexive and reciprocal constructs. The curriculum is based upon the five Standards in World Language Education which are communication, cultures, connections, comparisons and communities. *The honors level course includes a Pre-AP curriculum to further build language skills in listening, reading, speaking and writing in a format similar to the AP Spanish Language exam. Prerequisite: 90% or above in Spanish I. 
  • Spanish III

    This course is an intermediate-advanced level Spanish language course. Students will expand their language skills in listening, reading, speaking and writing. Complex grammatical structures will be reviewed and expanded upon, including the use of the subjunctive mood in a variety of situations, the use of future and conditional verb tenses, expansion on the imperative tense and an introduction to the passive voice. The curriculum is based upon the five Standards in World Language Education which are communication, cultures, connections, comparisons and communities. 
  • Spanish III Honors

    This course is an intermediate-advanced level Spanish language course. Students will expand their language skills in listening, reading, speaking and writing. Complex grammatical structures will be reviewed and expanded upon, including the use of the subjunctive mood in a variety of situations, the use of future and conditional verb tenses, expansion on the imperative tense and an introduction to the passive voice. The curriculum is based upon the five Standards in World Language Education which are communication, cultures, connections, comparisons and communities.
  • Spanish IV Honors

    This course is an advanced level Spanish language course. Students will grow their language skills in listening, reading, speaking and writing. All concepts presented in previous levels will be reviewed and examined at a higher level of detail focusing on the minute details of the Spanish language. Students will explore smaller grammatical structures such as the use and omission of definite and indefinite articles, the use of the passive voice in a variety of situations and examine further the use of the subjunctive mood. This course is preparatory for the AP Spanish Language exam as it introduces students to interpretive, interpersonal and presentational communication styles for all themes present on the AP Spanish Language exam. The curriculum is based upon the five Standards in World Language Education which are communication, cultures, connections, comparisons and communities.

    *The honors level course includes a Pre-AP curriculum to further build language skills in listening, reading, speaking and writing in a format similar to the AP Spanish Language exam.